Baseball Hall of Fame 2017 Induction Limited Edition Full Size 34" Replica Signature Bat

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441120
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The ultimate Induction collectible, this limited edition collectible bat from Louisville Slugger features the engraved replica signatures of the 2017 Induction Class and the Hall of Fame logo in gold fill with a rich mahogany finish. Available in a limited edition of 1,000 bats. Full-size hardwood bat measures 35" in length The Hall of Fame logo and replica signatures of the 2017 inductees are engraved in each bat with a gold fill.  The 2017 Induction Class consists of Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez, John Schuerholz and Bud Selig.

  • Each bat is finished with a rich mahogany stain and protective clear coat 
  • Limited edition of 1,000 individually numbered bats
  • Made in the USA 
  • Baseball Hall of Fame exclusive Item
Player Biography

Perhaps the subject of the most well-known deadline deal in history, Jeff Bagwell proved to be the perfect fit in Houston. Traded by his hometown Red Sox before he ever appeared in a big league game, Bagwell won the National League Rookie of the Year Award in 1991 with his patient approach at the plate. By 1994, Bagwell added power to his resume, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 116 runs in the strike-shortened 1994 season to win the NL MVP Award. In 15 big league seasons, Bagwell hit .297 with 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI and a .408 on-base percentage. The four-time All-Star spent his entire 15-year big league career with the Astros.

Featuring a rarely seen combination of power and speed, Tim Raines defined the modern leadoff hitter. Raines stole at least 70 bases in each of his first six big league seasons, winning the 1986 NL batting title along the way. With a .385 career on-base percentage, Raines kept the pressure on opponents by succeeding in 84.7 percent of his stolen base attempts – the top figure of any player with at least 400 steals. In each of four seasons from 1983-86, Raines stole at least 70 bases, totaled at least 50 extra-base hits and posted an on-base percentage of .390 or better – exactly half of the eight seasons like that in baseball history. A seven-time All-Star, Raines finished his career with 808 steals, fifth-most all-time.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed “Pudge” and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times, Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles – the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year’s NLCS Most Valuable Player Award.

The architect of state-of-the-art teams in both Kansas City and Atlanta, John Schuerholz switched careers in his mid-20s – going from middle school teacher to front office executive. After learning on the job with the Orioles in the late 1960s, Schuerholz joined the expansion Royals and helped lay the groundwork for one of the most consistent teams of the late 70s and early 80s. He became the youngest general manager in baseball in 1981 with the Royals, fine-tuning the roster into the club that would win the 1985 World Series. Moving to Atlanta in 1990, Schuerholz quickly turned the Braves into a National League powerhouse, winning five NL pennants and the 1995 World Series from 1991-99 – making him the first GM in history to capture World Series titles in both leagues. Leading the Braves to 14 straight postseason appearances from 1991-2005, Schuerholz established himself as one of the game’s top talent evaluators.

Over 23 years as MLB’s commissioner, Allan H. “Bud” Selig guided baseball through some of the most significant changes in the game’s history. As the owner of the Milwaukee Brewers throughout the 1970s and 80s, Selig became one of baseball’s most influential voices. He took over as acting commissioner in 1992 and then accepted the permanent position in 1998, serving more seasons as MLB’s leader than anyone except Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Under Selig, MLB enjoyed 20-plus years of labor peace following the 1994-95 strike and experienced a ballpark boom that featured almost two dozen new stadiums. Selig retired Jackie Robinson's No. 42 throughout baseball in 1997, oversaw the league's expansion into three divisions per league along with the postseason addition of the Wild Cards and helped establish the toughest anti-drug measures in all of sport.

 

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The ultimate Induction collectible, this limited edition collectible bat from Louisville Slugger features the engraved replica signatures of the 2017 Induction Class and the Hall of Fame logo in gold fill with a rich mahogany finish. Available in a limited edition of 1,000 bats. Full-size hardwood bat measures 35" in length The Hall of Fame logo and replica signatures of the 2017 inductees are engraved in each bat with a gold fill.  The 2017 Induction Class consists of Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez, John Schuerholz and Bud Selig.

  • Each bat is finished with a rich mahogany stain and protective clear coat 
  • Limited edition of 1,000 individually numbered bats
  • Made in the USA 
  • Baseball Hall of Fame exclusive Item
Player Biography

Perhaps the subject of the most well-known deadline deal in history, Jeff Bagwell proved to be the perfect fit in Houston. Traded by his hometown Red Sox before he ever appeared in a big league game, Bagwell won the National League Rookie of the Year Award in 1991 with his patient approach at the plate. By 1994, Bagwell added power to his resume, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 116 runs in the strike-shortened 1994 season to win the NL MVP Award. In 15 big league seasons, Bagwell hit .297 with 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI and a .408 on-base percentage. The four-time All-Star spent his entire 15-year big league career with the Astros.

Featuring a rarely seen combination of power and speed, Tim Raines defined the modern leadoff hitter. Raines stole at least 70 bases in each of his first six big league seasons, winning the 1986 NL batting title along the way. With a .385 career on-base percentage, Raines kept the pressure on opponents by succeeding in 84.7 percent of his stolen base attempts – the top figure of any player with at least 400 steals. In each of four seasons from 1983-86, Raines stole at least 70 bases, totaled at least 50 extra-base hits and posted an on-base percentage of .390 or better – exactly half of the eight seasons like that in baseball history. A seven-time All-Star, Raines finished his career with 808 steals, fifth-most all-time.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed “Pudge” and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times, Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles – the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year’s NLCS Most Valuable Player Award.

The architect of state-of-the-art teams in both Kansas City and Atlanta, John Schuerholz switched careers in his mid-20s – going from middle school teacher to front office executive. After learning on the job with the Orioles in the late 1960s, Schuerholz joined the expansion Royals and helped lay the groundwork for one of the most consistent teams of the late 70s and early 80s. He became the youngest general manager in baseball in 1981 with the Royals, fine-tuning the roster into the club that would win the 1985 World Series. Moving to Atlanta in 1990, Schuerholz quickly turned the Braves into a National League powerhouse, winning five NL pennants and the 1995 World Series from 1991-99 – making him the first GM in history to capture World Series titles in both leagues. Leading the Braves to 14 straight postseason appearances from 1991-2005, Schuerholz established himself as one of the game’s top talent evaluators.

Over 23 years as MLB’s commissioner, Allan H. “Bud” Selig guided baseball through some of the most significant changes in the game’s history. As the owner of the Milwaukee Brewers throughout the 1970s and 80s, Selig became one of baseball’s most influential voices. He took over as acting commissioner in 1992 and then accepted the permanent position in 1998, serving more seasons as MLB’s leader than anyone except Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Under Selig, MLB enjoyed 20-plus years of labor peace following the 1994-95 strike and experienced a ballpark boom that featured almost two dozen new stadiums. Selig retired Jackie Robinson's No. 42 throughout baseball in 1997, oversaw the league's expansion into three divisions per league along with the postseason addition of the Wild Cards and helped establish the toughest anti-drug measures in all of sport.

 

Men's Jerseys

JERSEY SIZE 40 44 48 52 56 60
Size Equivalent S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL
Chest 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"
Waist 28 - 30" 32 - 34" 36 - 38" 40 - 42" 44 - 46" 48 - 50" 52 - 54"
Hip 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"