Bill Purdom Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson “Strike Three” 16 x 20 Lithograph- Limited Edition of 500

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SKU:
800200 STR3
$100.00
Sale Price $30.00

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Measuring 16" tall x 20" wide, this lithograph, officially titled Strike Three, is limited in edition to 500 prints. Each is numbered, titled and signed by the artist, Bill Purdom, from whose original painting the fine art print has been exactingly reproduced onto acid-free paper, which is noted for its long-term archival abilities.

 

The 1942 Negro World Series gained the attention of the entire country. Attendees of this storied event got their money’s worth as Satchel Paige and the Kansas City Monarchs matched up against Josh Gibson and the Washington-Homestead Grays. In Game 2, according to legend, in an effort to face slugger Gibson with the game on the line, Paige intentionally walked the bases loaded to bring Gibson up to bat. Paige said he struck Gibson out on three pitches, the perfect ending to a fantastic story.

 

  • Limited Edition of 500
  • Hand signed, titled and numbered by the late artist Bill Purdom
  • Measures 16” x 20”
  • Recreated on archival paper
  • Baseball Hall of Fame Exclusive Item

Player Biography

Leroy “Satchel” Paige was one of the most entertaining pitchers in baseball history. A tall, lanky fireballer, he was arguably the hardest thrower in the Negro leagues, as well as one of its greatest gate attractions. James “Cool Papa” Bell once declared, “He made his living by throwing the ball to a spot over the plate the size of a matchbook.” In the 1930s, Paige barnstormed around the continent, baffling hitters with creatively named pitches like the “Bat Dodger” and “Hesitation Pitch.” In 1948, on his 42nd birthday, Paige’s contract was sold to the Cleveland Indians, making him the oldest player to debut in the major leagues.


The greatest power hitter in black baseball, Josh Gibson pounded home runs with regularity, despite playing most of his career in two of baseball’s most cavernous ballparks: Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson said, “Gibson could do everything – he hits the ball a mile. And he catches so easy he might just as well be in a rocking chair.” Gibson utilized a fluid, compact swing to hit for both average and power, and tales of his mammoth home runs became legendary. A larger-than-life figure, he died just three months before the integration of baseball in the major leagues in 1947.

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Measuring 16" tall x 20" wide, this lithograph, officially titled Strike Three, is limited in edition to 500 prints. Each is numbered, titled and signed by the artist, Bill Purdom, from whose original painting the fine art print has been exactingly reproduced onto acid-free paper, which is noted for its long-term archival abilities.

 

The 1942 Negro World Series gained the attention of the entire country. Attendees of this storied event got their money’s worth as Satchel Paige and the Kansas City Monarchs matched up against Josh Gibson and the Washington-Homestead Grays. In Game 2, according to legend, in an effort to face slugger Gibson with the game on the line, Paige intentionally walked the bases loaded to bring Gibson up to bat. Paige said he struck Gibson out on three pitches, the perfect ending to a fantastic story.

 

  • Limited Edition of 500
  • Hand signed, titled and numbered by the late artist Bill Purdom
  • Measures 16” x 20”
  • Recreated on archival paper
  • Baseball Hall of Fame Exclusive Item

Player Biography

Leroy “Satchel” Paige was one of the most entertaining pitchers in baseball history. A tall, lanky fireballer, he was arguably the hardest thrower in the Negro leagues, as well as one of its greatest gate attractions. James “Cool Papa” Bell once declared, “He made his living by throwing the ball to a spot over the plate the size of a matchbook.” In the 1930s, Paige barnstormed around the continent, baffling hitters with creatively named pitches like the “Bat Dodger” and “Hesitation Pitch.” In 1948, on his 42nd birthday, Paige’s contract was sold to the Cleveland Indians, making him the oldest player to debut in the major leagues.


The greatest power hitter in black baseball, Josh Gibson pounded home runs with regularity, despite playing most of his career in two of baseball’s most cavernous ballparks: Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson said, “Gibson could do everything – he hits the ball a mile. And he catches so easy he might just as well be in a rocking chair.” Gibson utilized a fluid, compact swing to hit for both average and power, and tales of his mammoth home runs became legendary. A larger-than-life figure, he died just three months before the integration of baseball in the major leagues in 1947.

Men's Jerseys

JERSEY SIZE 40 44 48 52 56 60
Size Equivalent S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL
Chest 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"
Waist 28 - 30" 32 - 34" 36 - 38" 40 - 42" 44 - 46" 48 - 50" 52 - 54"
Hip 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"