Baseball Hall of Fame 2008 Induction Class Metal Dog Tag and Chain

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57168
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Commemorating the 2008 Hall of Fame Induction class, this metal dog tag features the Hall of Fame logo, year of the class and the members of the class listed - Barney Dreyfuss, Goose Gossage, Bowie Kuhn,  Walter O'Malley, Billy Southworth, and Dick Williams.  Both a 28" necklace chain and a 2" keychain chain accompany the dog tag.

  • Metal dog tag
  • Induction Class listed along with HOF logo
  • 18" chain and 2" chain both included
  • Baseball Hall of Fame Exclusive Item
Player Biography

An innovative team owner and policy maker, Barney Dreyfuss was one of the most highly regarded executives in organized baseball. During his career, he merged his Louisville Colonels with the Pittsburgh Pirates to form a National League powerhouse, was one of the original advocates of a commissioner’s office in baseball, helped to establish the modern World Series and was the Senior Circuit’s first vice president. As president of the Pirates from 1900 until his death in 1932, Dreyfuss led Pittsburgh to six pennants, two World Series and 21 finishes of third place or better.

With his blazing fastball and intimidating scowl, Richard “Goose” Gossage redefined success for relievers. After breaking in with the White Sox in 1972, Gossage found his role when manager Chuck Tanner made him his bullpen ace in 1975. Gossage saved 26 games that season and another 26 in 1977 after a trade to the Pirates. He left for free agent riches in New York in 1978, helping the Yankees win the World Series that year by saving 27 games and winning 10 more. Then in 1984 – in his first season with the Padres – Gossage saved 25 games to help San Diego win its first National League pennant. He finished his 22-year big league career with 124 wins, 310 saves and nine All-Star Game selections.

A lawyer by trade, Bowie Kuhn’s baseball odyssey went from working the scoreboard at Washington’s Griffith Stadium to becoming Major League Baseball’s fifth commissioner in 1969. During his 15-year tenure, baseball experienced dramatic increases in attendance, salaries, revenue and franchise values. While steering the game through labor strife and the establishment of free agency, Kuhn introduced night baseball to the World Series, expanded television coverage and instituted divisional play in each league.

Walter O’Malley is among the most influential baseball team owners of the last half of the 20th Century. He was a persuasive and visionary businessman who altered the big league landscape with seismic force by moving his Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. Thwarted in attempts to replace an outdated Ebbets Field, O’Malley led baseball’s geographic expansion west after the 1957 season by relocating his team to California, while convincing the New York Giants to follow suit. Under O’Malley’s ownership, the Dodgers became the “gold standard” of baseball franchises, winning 11 pennants and four World Series titles.

Billy Southworth spent 13 seasons as an outfielder and 13 as a National League manager. Respected by his players, Southworth skippered the St. Louis Cardinals for seven seasons, averaging 101 wins a season between 1941 and 1945. He won three pennants with the Redbirds, along with World Series titles in 1942 and 1944. During his six-year stint as manager of the Boston Braves, Southworth brought the perennial league doormats their first pennant in 34 years during the 1948 season. Southworth finished with a 1,064-729 record, the fifth-best winning percentage (.593) of all time.

He specialized in turning losers into winners, and Dick Williams did it often enough to earn a place in Cooperstown. Following a 13-year big league playing career that ended in Boston after the 1964 season, Williams spent two seasons managing in Triple-A before being named the Red Sox’s manager in 1967. The rookie skipper led the Sox to their Impossible Dream, going from ninth place the year before to an AL pennant. He took over the Oakland A’s in 1971 and led them to three AL West titles, two AL pennants and two World Series championships in three seasons. After a stint with the Angels, he turned the Expos into consistent winners before heading for San Diego, where he led the Padres to their first NL Pennant in 1984. He finished his career with 1,571 wins.

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Commemorating the 2008 Hall of Fame Induction class, this metal dog tag features the Hall of Fame logo, year of the class and the members of the class listed - Barney Dreyfuss, Goose Gossage, Bowie Kuhn,  Walter O'Malley, Billy Southworth, and Dick Williams.  Both a 28" necklace chain and a 2" keychain chain accompany the dog tag.

  • Metal dog tag
  • Induction Class listed along with HOF logo
  • 18" chain and 2" chain both included
  • Baseball Hall of Fame Exclusive Item
Player Biography

An innovative team owner and policy maker, Barney Dreyfuss was one of the most highly regarded executives in organized baseball. During his career, he merged his Louisville Colonels with the Pittsburgh Pirates to form a National League powerhouse, was one of the original advocates of a commissioner’s office in baseball, helped to establish the modern World Series and was the Senior Circuit’s first vice president. As president of the Pirates from 1900 until his death in 1932, Dreyfuss led Pittsburgh to six pennants, two World Series and 21 finishes of third place or better.

With his blazing fastball and intimidating scowl, Richard “Goose” Gossage redefined success for relievers. After breaking in with the White Sox in 1972, Gossage found his role when manager Chuck Tanner made him his bullpen ace in 1975. Gossage saved 26 games that season and another 26 in 1977 after a trade to the Pirates. He left for free agent riches in New York in 1978, helping the Yankees win the World Series that year by saving 27 games and winning 10 more. Then in 1984 – in his first season with the Padres – Gossage saved 25 games to help San Diego win its first National League pennant. He finished his 22-year big league career with 124 wins, 310 saves and nine All-Star Game selections.

A lawyer by trade, Bowie Kuhn’s baseball odyssey went from working the scoreboard at Washington’s Griffith Stadium to becoming Major League Baseball’s fifth commissioner in 1969. During his 15-year tenure, baseball experienced dramatic increases in attendance, salaries, revenue and franchise values. While steering the game through labor strife and the establishment of free agency, Kuhn introduced night baseball to the World Series, expanded television coverage and instituted divisional play in each league.

Walter O’Malley is among the most influential baseball team owners of the last half of the 20th Century. He was a persuasive and visionary businessman who altered the big league landscape with seismic force by moving his Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. Thwarted in attempts to replace an outdated Ebbets Field, O’Malley led baseball’s geographic expansion west after the 1957 season by relocating his team to California, while convincing the New York Giants to follow suit. Under O’Malley’s ownership, the Dodgers became the “gold standard” of baseball franchises, winning 11 pennants and four World Series titles.

Billy Southworth spent 13 seasons as an outfielder and 13 as a National League manager. Respected by his players, Southworth skippered the St. Louis Cardinals for seven seasons, averaging 101 wins a season between 1941 and 1945. He won three pennants with the Redbirds, along with World Series titles in 1942 and 1944. During his six-year stint as manager of the Boston Braves, Southworth brought the perennial league doormats their first pennant in 34 years during the 1948 season. Southworth finished with a 1,064-729 record, the fifth-best winning percentage (.593) of all time.

He specialized in turning losers into winners, and Dick Williams did it often enough to earn a place in Cooperstown. Following a 13-year big league playing career that ended in Boston after the 1964 season, Williams spent two seasons managing in Triple-A before being named the Red Sox’s manager in 1967. The rookie skipper led the Sox to their Impossible Dream, going from ninth place the year before to an AL pennant. He took over the Oakland A’s in 1971 and led them to three AL West titles, two AL pennants and two World Series championships in three seasons. After a stint with the Angels, he turned the Expos into consistent winners before heading for San Diego, where he led the Padres to their first NL Pennant in 1984. He finished his career with 1,571 wins.

Men's Jerseys

JERSEY SIZE 40 44 48 52 56 60
Size Equivalent S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL
Chest 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"
Waist 28 - 30" 32 - 34" 36 - 38" 40 - 42" 44 - 46" 48 - 50" 52 - 54"
Hip 34 - 36" 38 - 40" 42 - 44" 46 - 48" 50 - 52" 54 - 56" 58 - 60"